Seeing A Bit of the Spectrum

 

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Photo by tangle_eye @ Morguefile.com

 

The original post I was going to produce today is no more, as the motivation for producing was resolved. In its place is going to be something a bit more manageable, a bit more approachable, and perhaps more beneficial to my audience.

Back when I began writing on Eyes Through the Glass, it was at the behest of my ex-girlfriend that I was dating at the time. She spoke to my ability to articulate what it was like to live with Asperger’s Syndrome.

The reason that I migrated from Eyes Through the Glass and shut it down was because, as it turns out, there was only so much I could directly say about Asperger’s. Eventually, the blog lost its focus and because it had devolved so far beyond its original purpose it had to be shut down. Admittedly, I was in a darker place at that time.

But, what has become clear to me is that the work that I originally began on Eyes Through the Glass still needs to be done. At the request of one of my friends who wanted to know more, I decided to offer a little bit of what it’s like.

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For College Students, Living With Depression is an Invisible War

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There’s a war going on. The battlefield is not a country far and away from the public eye. It is in our own backyard, in an area where the entire population consists of civilians. It is an invisible war, a quiet crisis that speaks only when spoken to. That battlefield is the college campus. The battle is not between political adversaries but internal struggles with depression.

According to the National Institutes of Health, 6.7 percent of Americans are annually affected, making it the most ubiquitous mood disorder. Additionally, in 2009 the American College Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) found that nearly 30 percent of college students reported feeling “so depressed that it was difficult to function” during the past year. College is a heavy hitter, as now students must deal with increased responsibilities while learning to function more independently. Maggie Alexander, a student Howard Community College, said, “[Depression] has made it harder to focus on my schoolwork and it has also gotten to the point where I have trust issues with most people if I don’t know them too well.”

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